Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Otherworldly East End Lighthouse Investigation



Light houses are, by nature, mysterious. Lonely sentinels, lonely witnesses to shipwrecks when the ships fail to heed the light's warnings. And many lighthouses are famous for being haunted.



East End Lighthouse, guarding the entrance to Delaware Bay at Lewes, DE, is no different, and just as haunted, or so the stories claim. We jumped at the chance to join Intuitive Investigations as it led a public ghost hunt in the lighthouse.

I love ghost hunting -- the possibility of encountering a spirit or having a paranormal experience both thrills and scares me. I've been on a handful of ghost hunts and the experiences are always different.



Intuitive Investigations emphasizes the "scientific method" with its paranormal investigations (please note, Intuitive Investigations does not like these referred to as ghost hunts). Dr. Carol A. Pollio, Director, Intuitive Investigations, also emphasizes a number of rules:
  • Do NOT tell the spirits they are dead. That is rude. And could be shocking, if the spirit thinks it's still alive.
  • Do NOT call the spirit a ghost. That is rude. Spirit is preferred.
  • No photos except with the team's cameras.
  • No equipment except for what the team provides.


Pollio also emphasizes that her background in environmental science provides her the expertise and authority regarding scientific principles and equipment, learning how to identify the most compelling evidence of paranormal activity, versus logically explainable phenomena (differentiating normal versus paranormal results).

Of the numerous ghost hunts paranormal investigations we've been on, this one was the most restrictive. We couldn't use our own equipment; we couldn't use our own cameras. The questions were asked by Pollio. However, playing devils advocate to my own discontent with these restrictions, I understand that the rules allow Intuitive Investigations to ensure clarity of the "evidence," avoid participants from muddying the evidence with faked or misunderstood evidence, kept the background noise to a minimum, and so forth.



During the investigation, recorders, cameras, dowsing rods, pendulums, thermal cameras, and REM Pods were all used. Note: none of these have been scientifically proven to be useful tools to reveal the existence of ghosts, which are themselves not scientifically proven to exist.



None of this has been proved. Not one. We don't know if spirit box voices or EMFs or EVPs are generated by spirits. This is all speculation, although commonly accepted in the paranormal investigative community. (I accept that these are cool tools that may indicate paranormal activity.)



Still, during the ghost hunt paranormal investigation, a number of interesting EVPs were recorded. Participants asked, “Will you go upstairs with us?” A disembodied female voice responds, “Come back down.” REM Pod responses during this EVP session are very clear and numerous.

  • In an ongoing conversation with a possible ghost who had indicated he was a Keeper, when asked if he was from Virginia, responded, “Early on.”
  • One investigator in the living quarters asked if the spirit/ghost was a lighthouse keeper (no response) or were they an assistant? (answered “Yessss”). 
  • An investigator was discussing previous responses that indicated five spirits were present. Suddenly, the spirit box blurted out: “Five at least” and then immediately: “I think he’s right.”


I have to admit, now that I've been on more than a handful of organized ghost hunts paranormal investigations, that although the site was intriguing (a ghost hunt paranormal investigation in a haunted light house!!), that the restrictions made the investigation a bit boring: ghost hunts paranormal investigations are a bit boring anyway, until the one thrilling moment something happens, and then it becomes quickly boring again. Taking photographs during the ghost hunt paranormal investigation in the hopes of catching something -- anything -- helps alleviate that boredom, and makes a better article for you to read, too, to be honest. All of these photos were taken during a previous story-telling tour of the lighthouse.



During the ghost hunt paranormal investigation, one of the Intuitive Investigations staff said, authoritatively, that everyone has two guardian spirits. Huh. I wasn't aware that that's been scientifically confirmed. (And if so, mine really need to step up their game.)



Dowsing rods and pendulums, both embraced by Intuitive Investigations (and many, many other paranormal groups), and both really fun tools on ghost hunts paranormal investigations, are so easily influenced by the person holding them, even if they're trying REALLY REALLY hard not to. These are not scientific instruments, not by a long shot.



I know this. And yet I still find these ghost hunts paranormal investigations incredible fun. I love going on them, and even as I write this, I'm laughing at myself, because my friend and I are in the process of arranging our next ghost hunt.

I'm only commenting on this because of the emphasis on the scientific method and the science-based investigations with Intuitive Investigations. It may all be hooey, or it may be real, but in the end, Intuitive Investigations provides a decently fun experience: you learn how to use all the equipment -- again, all commonly accepted as legitimate ghost-hunting equipment in the paranormal field -- and get opportunities to try them. I believe they are sincere, that nothing is faked (unlike another ghost hunt I attended, in which we're pretty sure "results" were manufactured to create the impression that an entity was present -- I have decided NOT to write about that one in MidAtlanticDayTrips).



So, if you get the chance to go on the East End Lighthouse Paranormal Investigation, I say, go go go! You'll get to investigate in a haunted lighthouse. And really, how many opportunities do you get to do that?

Hours: Please check the website for upcoming paranormal investigation events.

Website: https://www.capewatertaxi.co








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